10 Web Accessibility Best Practices


1. A user must be able to use the keyboard to complete all interactions.

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2. Provide appropriate alternative text

Use color to communicate meaning (they tell us which item is the current selection)
Use Font Weight (they tell us which item is the current selection)
Indentation of navigation items (they tell us about which items are parent and child)
Use of Arrows (they tell us about which sections are expanded or collapsed)

3. Provide visual orientation in navigations and make sure links make sense out of context

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4. Ensure proximity in design

If two things are closely related, they need to be close together in the interface.
e.g. Pop-up/Dialog Help Content – need to be together with the “What’s This Link”

5. Strive for clarity – setting expectations for interactions

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6. Provide perfect content

How do we know what people (with disabilities) need?
Ask them. Observe how they work. Understand how they think. Use that to shape the content that you deliver –
present the right information. Once you know what the right information – you can start think about the right time and place to present that information.
Present any specific content that people with disabilities need: include in listing of branches locations which ones have ramps

7. Designing for memory issues

Out of sight – Out of mind
e.g.: Error messages – display them in real time for each field, not as a collection on top of the page.
Date/time form field – the prompt disappears once you start typing.

8. Flexibility in the interface

Flexibility in the interface – they need to be able to customize the display of the website to work well for the way their eyes work. They need to be able to increase the font size and reflow the layout form into vertical stacks
to make it easier to present the information.

9. Create text-based representations of visual elements

Doughnut charts or graphs – aren’t useful to someone that can’t see, unless there’s some text-based representation
available: brief description of the visual or a table that provides same data with a summary.

10. Create interactions that allow multiple methods of achieving the same goal.

Doughnut charts or graphs – aren’t useful to someone that can’t see, unless there’s some text-based representation
available: brief description of the visual or a table that provides same data with a summary.

Gabriela Statie
Gabriela Aurora Statie

I’m Gabriela - User Experience Designer - passionate about accessibility, design and tech. Coming from a visual background, focused on putting users first and providing a complete end-to-end design service. “Usability is like love. You have to care, you have to listen, and you have to be willing to change. You’ll make mistakes along the way, but that’s where growth and forgiveness come in.” - Jeffrey Feldman

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